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Sister Margaret Ann Moser, OSUSister Margaret Ann Moser, OSU, died Nov. 16, 2017, after a brief stay in hospice.

Born Oct. 9, 1937, Sister Margaret Ann graduated from Ursuline Academy of Dallas in 1956 and shortly thereafter joined the Ursuline Sisters. She professed her vows in 1959.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in history from the College of New Rochelle in New Rochelle, New York, and her master’s degree in theology from St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas.

Her outstanding career included teaching and administrative positions at Ursuline schools in Galveston, Texas; Springfield, Illinois; St. Louis, Missouri; and New Orleans, Louisiana. After 31 years in these ministries, she returned to Ursuline Academy of Dallas, where she served as President from 1989 to 2012.

Sister Margaret Ann received the Catholic Foundation Award in 2012 in recognition of her commitment to Catholic education and the Dallas community. She also served on the boards of Ursuline Academy of New Orleans, Duchesne Academy of the Sacred Heart in Houston, Alcuin Montessori School in Dallas, the Catholic Housing Initiative, and the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, Dec. 4, at St. Rita Catholic Church in Dallas. May Sister Margaret Ann, a most gracious woman who showered all who knew her with kindness, love, humor and a generous spirit, rest in peace.


Heartbeats“Above all, obey the Holy Spirit who speaks to you in your heart.” ~ St. Angela 

The November issue of “Heartbeats,” our monthly newsletter that focuses on the charism of St. Angela, is now online. As we continue to explore St. Angela’s contemplative spirit, we focus this month on discernment and gratitude.

“Heartbeats” is a collaborative effort of the three U.S. provinces—Central, East and West—intended to integrate and focus a shared exploration of Angela’s charism and spirit as the Ursulines, associates, colleagues and companions are called to live it today and into the future.

Read “Heartbeats.”
 


Sister Helen Louise Schmitz, OSUSister Helen Louise Schmitz, OSU, formerly known as Mother Mary Julian, died peacefully Nov.13, 2017, at Loretto Home in Springfield, Illinois. She was 98.

The daughter of Frederick William and Elsie Louise Boehm Schmitz, Sister Helen Louise was born in Glendale, Missouri, on May 26, 1919. She entered the Ursuline Sisters in 1939 and professed her vows on July 16, 1941.

Sister Helen Louise taught organ, piano, clarinet, violin and guitar. She was church organist and director of children’s mixed choirs, boys’ choir and adult choirs. She taught in grade schools and high schools in Missouri, Illinois, Louisiana and Minnesota. She also taught at Dominican College in New Orleans and Springfield College in Springfield. She was a member of the Diocesan Liturgical Commission in the diocese of Springfield in Illinois.

In addition to teaching on all grade levels and playing five musical instruments, she was gifted in music and art. She composed a Mass in honor of St. Patrick in 1994. Her preferred medium in art was design and sketching in pen and ink. She did tatting on cards/stationery, embroidered, knitted, created her own designs on plastic canvas, made church banners and sewed much of her own clothing.

Read more.

 

Feast of St. UrsulaOn Oct. 21 we celebrate the Feast of St. Ursula, whom Angela chose as the patron of her Company. Historically we know very little about this woman who came to be called Ursula. Mary Cabrini Durkin, in her book, “Angela’s Journey of Heart,” tells us:  Today it is only through legend, sacred art and institutions dedicated to God under Ursula’s patronage that we know something of this Christian woman, virgin and martyr of the 4th century and the spirit she engendered.”

The basic outline of the legend of Ursula and her companions is this: Ursula was the only child of a Christian king and queen in Britain. She dedicated herself to Christ at an early age. A neighboring pagan ruler sought to annex her parents’ realm by forcing marriage between Ursula and his son. Inspired in a dream, Ursula offered a creative plan: delay marriage three years while she and her ten young female companions made a voyage, each accompanied by a thousand girls. Ursula was their captain and leader in faith. She saw this adventure as an opportunity to lead them, and her suiter as well, to Christ. However, two commanders became suspicious of this group of young women as they saw the influence the women were having among others on the ship. The two men plotted to ambush the pilgrims at Cologne, where all the women but Ursula were massacred. The chief spared Ursula and sought her as his wife. When she rejected his offer, he shot her with an arrow.

As a virgin and martyr, Ursula lived a counter-cultural life, which was fostered by a prayerful spirit. As a risk taker and leader, she attracted many others to Christ and to a new way of life. As Cabrini Durkin tells us, “She is a leader of brave women of faith, loyal to Christ.” 


HeartbeatsThe October issue of “Heartbeats,” our monthly newsletter that focuses on the charism—or special gift—of St. Angela is now online. In this issue, our reflection on Angela’s contemplative spirit focuses on the counter-cultural aspect of living contemplatively.

“Heartbeats” is a collaborative effort of the three U.S. provinces—Central, East and West—intended to integrate and focus a shared exploration of Angela’s charism and spirit as the Ursulines, associates, colleagues and companions are called to live it today and into the future.

Read “Heartbeats.”


Sister Darlene Fulgenzi, OSUSister Darlene (Margherita) Fulgenzi, OSU, died peacefully on Oct. 11, 2017, at St. Andrew’s at Francis Place in Eureka, Missouri.

The daughter of Adolfo and Margaret Daniele Fulgenzi, she was born on February 28, 1938, in Springfield, Illinois. Sister Darlene attended St. Joseph’s elementary school and Ursuline Academy in Springfield, graduating in 1956. She entered the Ursuline Sisters in July 1956 and professed her vows in January 1959. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in classical languages from The College of New Rochelle in New Rochelle, New York, and her Master of Arts degree in Latin from St. Louis University. She also studied scripture and spirituality at the Ursuline Generalate in Rome during her tertian year of spiritual renewal in 1977-1978.

Her many years of ministry included teaching elementary grades at SS. Peter and Paul in Alton, Illinois, and Our Lady of Guadalupe in Galveston, Texas, and teaching high school students at Ursuline Academy in Kirkwood, Missouri, and Marquette High School in Alton, Illinois. Sister Darlene also served as the prioress of Ursuline communities in Alton; Galveston, Texas; Kirkwood; and Springfield. In her semi-retirement, she was the assistant archivist for the Alton Ursuline community. She retired to Francis Place in 2016.

A celebration of Sister Darlene’s life will be held on Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, at St. Joseph Church, 1345 N. 6th St., Springfield, Illinois, 62702. The visitation will be at 9 a.m. followed by an 11 a.m. funeral and interment at Calvary Cemetery.


Ursuline CrossWe, the Ursuline Sisters of the Roman Union, United States Provinces, stand with our Catholic Bishops in support of the Dream Act of 2017 (S1615). This past Sunday evening, October 8, the Trump Administration Immigration Policy priorities were issued. We strongly reject these anti-immigrant, anti-human rights, anti-family provisions as basically immoral.

These provisions propose the building of southern border walls and expedited deportations as condition for acting to protect young undocumented immigrants, the Dreamers, who were brought to the United States as children and now know no other home. These young people cannot become the bargaining chips in the game of politics. President Trump made a promise and acknowledged responsibilities to the Dreamers. These Policy Priorities are in direct opposition to these promises.

Children and young people are our future. Those brought to the United States as children are among those who warrant the security of a legal status to fulfill their dreams in the only country they have known, complete their education and continue contributing to society. Testimony abounds to their contributions in our country. The Dream Act helps our country towards a more secure future by providing a path for those individuals who meet the requirements to fully develop their potential without fear of deportation and with the hope of citizenship.

We urge Congress to support the Dream Act of 2017. This continues
our corporate stance regarding comprehensive immigration reform:

The Ursuline Sisters of the Roman Union in the United States
are committed to comprehensive and compassionate immigration reform. 
This is rooted in our profound belief in the dignity of each human person created in God’s image. We are all brothers and sisters. 
Our foundress, Angela Merici invites us to…
“love them all…because they are God’s children…
                       Welcome them and bear with all of them impartially.”

October 11, 2017
 

Convent Camino  December 8-9The Ursulines are participating in the Dec. 8-9 Convent Camino vocation retreat Dec. 8-9 in St. Louis.

 A Convent Camino is an opportunity for single women, ages 18-40, to visit with Catholic sisters in their houses and convents. This experience allows women to discover firsthand how sisters’ communities and ministries are making an impact in the world today, join sisters for prayer, and get to know them and ask them questions.

The event will begin at Mercy Center, and transportation will be provided to all other locations. All one needs to bring is “a curious spirit, overnight bag and an open heart.” The retreat costs $25, and scholarships are available. 

For more information or to register click here. (http://bit.ly/2hCWY7v)


Heartbeats September 2017“Nature is a balm, permeating and penetrating, soothing and revitalizing, re-greening the parched dry spaces of the land that is me. Nature is pure gift waiting to be received by anyone regardless of belief system, nationality, skin color, gender. Nature immersion quiets my thinking and opens me to mystery. Nature calls me to respect others and live in solidarity with them.” - Sister Paula Hartwig

Five Ursulines in the U.S. provinces share reflections on personal experiences of nature’s gifts in the September issue of “Heartbeats.”




Sister Maria Teresa de Llano at the borderLCWR Urges Action to Protect Dreamers – (Silver Spring, MD) The Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) shares the disappointment of millions of people across the country who had hoped and prayed that President Trump would continue the protection offered Dreamers by Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). DACA is a common-sense path to stability for families, communities, and local economies and a reaffirmation of American values. Ending DACA will cause irreparable harm to families and communities and force 800,000 of our young people back into the shadows.

In the wake of the unconscionable action by President Trump, we urge Congress to immediately take up and pass the bipartisan Dream Act of 2017.

As women of faith we take seriously the gospel call to welcome the stranger and care for those in need. LCWR and its members will continue to press for compassion for our neighbors, relief for families, and an end to needless deportations. “We will continue to advocate for bipartisan legislation that addresses our outdated immigration system,” said LCWR Executive Director Sister Joan Marie Steadman, CSC. “We will continue to stand in solidarity with families, regardless of immigration status, who labor daily to provide safety and security for their children. We will continue to walk with Dreamers and together with people of goodwill we will work to ensure that the dignity of all people is fully protected.”

Catholic sisters have a long history of accompanying immigrants and refugees. They continue to minister to these aspiring citizens in schools, hospitals, and service agencies along the southern border and across the country. They see the devastating effects of the current immigration system every day. They share the hopes and dreams of these young Americans who represent so much of what is right and good about this country we all call home.

LCWR is an association of leaders of congregations of Catholic women religious in the United States. The conference has nearly 1,300 members, including the Ursuline Sisters of the Central Province, who represent more than 38,800 women religious in the United States. Founded in 1956, LCWR assists its members to collaboratively carry out their service of leadership to further the mission of the Gospel in today’s world.

Ursuline Sister Maria Teresa de Llano serving immigrants at the border in Laredo.  
 

HeartbeatsThe Ursuline Sisters of the three U.S. provinces—Central, East and West—have launched Heartbeats, a monthly newsletter that focuses on the charism—or special gift—of St. Angela. This collaborative effort is intended to integrate and focus a shared exploration of Angela’s charism and spirit as the Ursulines, associates, colleagues and companions are called to live it today and into the future.

Different facets of Angela’s charism will be explored in this publication. Beginning with the August issue, Heartbeats will focus on Angela’s contemplative spirit for several issues.

Read Heartbeats


LCWRThe Ursuline Sisters of the Central Province, members of LCWR, support the following statement issued by the organization:

The Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) condemns racism in all its harmful forms whether the violent acts of the Ku Klux Klan, Neo-Nazis, and White Supremacist groups or the daily acts of hate and discrimination that diminish us all.

We grieve with the citizens of Charlottesville and all people of goodwill. We mourn with all who have lost loved ones, with all who live in fear, with all whose dignity is threatened by hate and violence. We lament the racism that continues to afflict our communities and threaten the values that we hold dear.

We acknowledge our own complicity in institutional racism. We commit ourselves to cleanse our hearts and rid our land of this evil. We promise to pray for our country and to continue to use our voice and our energy to build God’s beloved community where all are one in Christ Jesus.

LCWR is an association of leaders of congregations of Catholic women religious in the United States. The conference has nearly 1,300 members who represent more than 38,800 women religious in the United States. Founded in 1956, LCWR assists its members to collaboratively carry out their service of leadership to further the mission of the Gospel in today’s world.


Sister Anne Dorothy Schober, OSUSister Anne Dorothy Schober died peacefully on Aug. 14, 2017, in Los Roblas Hospital in Thousand Oaks, California. A celebration of her life was held Aug. 17 at St. Cyril of Jerusalem Church in Encino. 

The daughter of Robert J. Schober and Marguerite J. Sheils, she was born Jeanne Marie Schober on Oct. 17, 1945, in Jamaica, New York. She entered the Ursuline Sisters in Crystal City, Missouri, in July 1964 and professed her first vows in January 1967. In July she celebrated her golden jubilee among her Ursuline Sisters, family and friends in St. Louis.

A gentle woman of dispatch, Sister Anne Dorothy will be remembered for her deep faith, love for students and the teaching profession, and her wickedly keen sense of humor.

Read full obituary
 

Sister Anne Dorothy Schober in Encino, California

 


Sisters Maria Teresa de Llano, Rita Ann Bregenhorn, and Jean HopmanThe Ursulines of the Central Province installed a new leadership team during a blessing ceremony held June 2 in the provincial offices in St. Louis. Team members are Sister Rita Ann Bregenhorn, provincial; Sister Maria Teresa de Llano, councilor; and Sister Jean Hopman, councilor. Sister Rita Ann is beginning her second term as provincial after having served as a councilor for six years. Sister Jean is beginning her second three-year term on the council, and Sister Maria Teresa is a new member of the team.

We ask for your prayers for these three women who have answered the call from their sisters to serve the Central Province for the next three years. 
 

Sisters Maria Teresa de Llano, Rita Ann Bregenhorn and Jean Hopman